Upcoming Events By Month

« February 2019 »

Feb 1

Friday Feb 1, 2019

Book Launch for What Justices Want by Matthew Hall

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Location: 1030 Jenkins Nanovic Halls

The Rooney Center for the Study of American Democracy presents:

What Justices Want Book Launch by Matthew Hall

 

External Discussants: Lee Epstein (Washington University in St. Louis) and Eileen Braman (Indiana University Bloomington)

Location: 1030 Jenkins Nanovic Hall

 

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Feb 7

Thursday Feb 7, 2019

Book Launch - Prof. Elisabeth Köll - Railroads and the Transformation of China

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Location: Oak Room - South Dining Hall

Please join the Department of History at a reception to celebrate the work of Professor Elisabeth Köll
with an introduction by Parks M. Coble, James L. Sellers Professor of History, University of Nebraska-Lincoln.

As a vehicle to convey both the history of modern China and the complex forces still driving the nation’s economic success, rail has no equal. Railroads and the Transformation of China is the first comprehensive history, in any language, of railroad operation from the last decades of the Qing Empire to the present.…

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Feb 16

Saturday Feb 16, 2019

Junior Parents Weekend

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Location: Marie P. DeBartolo Performing Arts Center

The College of Arts and Letters Showcase for Junior Parents Weekend will begin at 10 am on Saturday, February 16, with a presentation by Arts and Letters faculty in the Browning Cinema.  From 11:15 am to noon there will be an informal reception for parents and students to meet with faculty and other representatives from the College of Arts and Letters.…

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Feb 19

Tuesday Feb 19, 2019

Risky Business: Nuclear Dangers in Conventional Wars

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Location: 1030 Jenkins Nanovic Halls

Reading Material – To be provided

Caitlin Talmadge is an Associate Professor in the Walsh School of Foreign Service at Georgetown University, where she serves on the core faculty of the Security Studies Program. She is also Non-Resident Senior Fellow in Foreign Policy at the Brookings Institution. Her research focuses on civil-military relations, military effectiveness, defense policy, deterrence and escalation, and Persian Gulf security issues. Her most recent book is ​ The Dictator’s Army: Battlefield Effectiveness in Authoritarian Regimes (Cornell University Press, 2015). She is currently writing a book on nuclear escalation in conventional wars. Previously, she was a professor at The George Washington University, where she was also a member of the Institute for Security & Conflict Studies.…

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Feb 21

Thursday Feb 21, 2019

How The Federalist Opened the Door to the ‘Antifederalist Appropriation’ of the Constitution

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Location: Jenkins and Nanovic Halls - Room B101

Lecture by Jeffrey Tulis (University of Texas at Austin) will begin at 12:30 in room 1030 of Jenkins and Nanovic Halls.

Event is free and open to the public  - lunch will be served at noon

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Feb 26

Tuesday Feb 26, 2019

Dispelling the Terrorist Safe Haven Myth: Why Americans Are Safer Than They Think

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Location: 1030 Jenkins Nanovic

Read Ahead Material  – To be provided

Risa Brooks’s research focuses on issues related to civil-military relations, military effectiveness, and militant & terrorist organizations; she also has a regional interest in the Middle East. Professor Brooks is the author of Shaping Strategy: The Civil- Military Politics of Strategic Assessment (Princeton University Press, 2008) and editor (with Elizabeth Stanley) of Creating Military Power: The Sources of Military Effectiveness (Stanford University Press, 2007), as well as many articles in the field of international security. She received her PhD from the University of California, San Diego and her professional experiences include positions as Research Associate at the International Institute for Strategic Studies (London, U.K.), Postdoctoral Fellow at Stanford’s Center for International Security and Arms Control (CISAC

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Feb 28

Thursday Feb 28, 2019

“‘A Worse Type of Slavery’: Photographic Witnessing along Georgia’s Jim Crow Roads”, lecture by Steven Hoelscher, University of Texas Austin

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Location: Snite Museum of Art

Steven Hoelscher, Professor of American Studies and Geography at the University of Texas Austin explores a crucial moment in the turbulent history of American race relations, when post-emancipation hopes for African American civic equality and economic independence were crushed by disenfranchisement, lynching, and a vast array of legal structures aimed at black suppression. Central to that white supremacist project was the South’s notorious penal system that coerced incarcerated African Americans into a new form of state-sponsored slavery. Although widely accepted by whites as a natural and beneficial solution to a labor shortage, the forced use of African American prisoners for the hard and often fatal work of road building and other tasks after the Civil War did not go unchallenged. Among those critics was the radical, investigative journalist John L. Spivak, whose anti-racist work may have helped him earn the moniker “America’s Greatest Reporter” from Time magazine, but who has been largely forgotten.…

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