Events

Oct 29

Tuesday Oct 29, 2019

Lecture: Metapoetical Passages in the Metamorphoses by Vittorio Hösle

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Location: 114 O'Shaughnessy Hall

The lecture analyzes some metapoetical passages of the Metamorphoses. It clarifies how Ovid is speaking through the myths about art—art in general, his own and others’—and how he thus helps us to interpret his main work correctly.

Vittorio Hösle is the Paul Kimball Professor of Arts and Letters in the Department of German and Russian Languages and Literatures and Concurrent Professor in the Departments of Political Science and Philosophy.…

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Oct 31

Thursday Oct 31, 2019

Kellogg Lecture: Identity or Policy? Evidence from Vote Switching in the United States

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Location: Hesburgh Center, C103

Kitschelt Event

The Kellogg Institute welcomes Herbert KitscheltGeorge V. Allen Professor of International Relations at Duke University.

In this talk, Herbert Kitschelt will examine the micro-logic of long-term changes in US electoral alignments. He takes on two debates: First, has the “working class” defected from the Democrats because its members vote on non-economic issues? Second, is the “responsible partisan theory” a poor “folk theory,” because, among other reasons, voting patterns cannot be explained by citizen awareness of party positions and actions?…

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Nov 1

Friday Nov 1, 2019

Legge Public Lecture

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Location: Jenkins and Nanovic Halls - Room 1030

Friday, November 1 -  Public Lecture
Rev. Dominic Legge, O.P., Pontifical Faculty of the Immaculate Conception and Thomistic Institute
12:30 pm (lunch at noon)  | Jenkins and Nanovic Halls, Room 1030 

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Nov 5

Tuesday Nov 5, 2019

Lecture: Constraining Dictatorship: From Personalized Rule to Institutionalized Regimes

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Location: Hesburgh Center C103

Constrainingdictorship

Anne MengAssistant Professor in the Department of Politics at the University of Virginia and Visiting Scholar at the University of Chicago (Fall 2019), will present an overview of her book project, which examines the creation and consequences of executive constraints in authoritarian regimes. How do some dictatorships become institutionalized ruled-based systems, while others remain heavily personalist? Once implemented, do executive constraints play an effective role in promoting autocratic stability? To understand patterns of regime institutionalization, Meng addresses the emergence of constitutional term limits and succession procedures, as well as elite power-sharing within presidential cabinets.…

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