Upcoming Events By Month

« October 2021 »

Oct 6

Wednesday Oct 6, 2021

The Twentieth Anniversary of September 11: Pax Americana?

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Location: 1030 Jenkins Nanovic Halls I Zoom Webinar

In what ways are current world crises—racial injustice, mass migration, inequality, and inadequate responses to the global pandemic—connected to the conditions of conflict that worsened after Sept. 11? Join us for the second in a series of three policy conversations.

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Oct 6

Wednesday Oct 6, 2021

Kroc-Kellogg Peace, Conflict, Crime and Violence Workshop

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Location: C104/105 Hesburgh Center for International Studies

"Drinking Tea with the Neighbors: Informal Clubs, Social Trust, and Trustworthiness in Mali"

Featuring Jaimie Bleck, Associate Professor of Political Science

Open to Ph.D. students, fellows, and faculty who are interested in civil war, violence, crime, peace, conflict management, and conflict resolution. The workshop is an informal gathering to discuss work-in-progress, dissertation chapters and proposals, practice conference talks, etc.

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Oct 8

Friday Oct 8, 2021

Clearing Up Some Misconceptions About the Supreme Court’s Shadow Docket—and Its Critics

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Location: Livestream

Notre Dame Law School’s chapter of the American Constitution Society is excited to announce that Professor Steve Vladeck of the University of Texas School of Law will be joining us (virtually) for a lunch event Friday, Oct. 8. Professor Vladeck's talk will begin at 12:30pm and is titled "Clearing Up Some Misconceptions About the Supreme Court’s Shadow Docket—and Its Critics." The event is co-sponsored by the National Lawyers Guild, ACLU and LGBT Law Forum at Notre Dame Law School.…

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Oct 12

Tuesday Oct 12, 2021

Climate Wars

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Location: 1030 JNH

Crawford

Neta C. Crawford is a professor of Political Science and currently chairs the department of political science. Her teaching focuses on international relations theory, international ethics, and normative change.  Crawford received the Distinguished Scholar award from the International Ethics section of the International Studies Association in 2018.…

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Oct 13

Wednesday Oct 13, 2021

"Clashing Paradigms in the Age of Emergency: Europe's Mediating Role in Democracy, Human Rights, and the Authoritarian Challenge to International Law" with Faculty Fellow Diane Desierto

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Location: 1050 Jenkins Nanovic Halls

"Clashing Paradigms in the Age of Emergency: Europe's Mediating Role in Democracy, Human Rights, and the Authoritarian Challenge to International Law"

Diane A. Desierto holds a joint appointment in the Keough School of Global Affairs and the Notre Dame Law School, where she is professor of law and LLM faculty director. Desierto teaches, publishes, and practices in international law and human rights, international economic law and development, international arbitration, maritime security, Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) Law, and comparative public law. She is a faculty fellow in the Keough School’s Klau Center for Civil Human Rights,

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Oct 14

Thursday Oct 14, 2021

Jeremy Wallace Lecture "Seeking Truth and Hiding Facts: Ideology, Information, and Authoritarianism in China"

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Location: Zoom webinar

 
Jeremy Lee Wallace

ABOUT THE LECTURE

Numbers came to define Chinese politics, until they did not count what mattered and what they counted did not measure up. Wallace's book argues that the Chinese government adopted a system of limited, quantified vision in order to survive the disasters unleashed by Mao Zedong’s ideological leadership, explains how that system worked, and analyzes how problems accumulated in its blind spots until Xi Jinping led the regime into a neopolitical turn. Xi’s new normal is an attempt fix the problems of the prior system, as well as a hedge against an inability to do so. The book argues that while of course dictators stay in power through coercion and cooptation, they also do so by convincing their populations and themselves of their right to rule. Quantification is one tool in this persuasive arsenal, but it comes with its own perils.

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Oct 14

Thursday Oct 14, 2021

Secular Left vs. Religious Right?

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Location: Virtual and in-person in Washington, DC

American society is rapidly secularizing–a radical departure from its historically high level of religiosity–and politics is a big part of the reason. Join us for a discussion about what this trend means for American politics and society. 

You can attend this event in-person or virtually. Registration is required for both options. 

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Oct 19

Tuesday Oct 19, 2021

China Town Hall 2021: Two-Part Event

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Location: Zoom webinar

China Town Hall

CNN host and best-selling author Fareed Zakaria will be the featured speaker for CHINA Town Hall 2021, a national conversation on how the U.S.-China relationship affects our cities, towns, and communities, on October 19. From supply chains to national security, new technologies to climate change, the future of both countries will be determined by their relations with one another and the global community. …

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Oct 26

Tuesday Oct 26, 2021

The President Who Would Not Be King: Executive Power Under the Constitution

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Location: Virtual

Please join us for a virtual lecture featuring Prof. Michael McConnell (Stanford University) on his new book, The President Who Would Not Be King: Executive Power under the Constitution.

 

Join on Zoom using this link: notredame.zoom.us/j/95877407086

Event is free and open to the public. 

 

Michael W. McConnell is the Richard and Frances Mallery Professor and Director of the Constitutional Law Center at Stanford Law School, and a Senior Fellow at the Hoover Institution. From 2002 to 2009, he served as a Circuit Judge on the United States Court of Appeals for the Tenth Circuit. McConnell has previously held chaired professorships at the University of Chicago and the University of Utah. He teaches courses on constitutional law, constitutional history, the First Amendment, and interpretive theory. Prof. McConnell has published widely in the fields of constitutional law and theory, especially church and state, equal protection, and separation of powers. His most recent book, The President Who Would Not Be King: Executive Power Under the Constitution

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Oct 26

Tuesday Oct 26, 2021

Graduate Student Social

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Location: 1050 Jenkins Nanovic Halls

The Graduate Student Social is back!  Escape your study carrels and connect with graduate students across campus at our in-person celebration and support of our Notre Dame graduate students. There will be free food and beverages as well as free books for perusal and acquisition. Hosted by the Nanovic Institute for European Studies.…

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Oct 26

Tuesday Oct 26, 2021

2021 Red Mass

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Location: Basilica of the Sacred Heart

Red Masses 2021

Bishop Kevin C. Rhoades of the Diocese of Fort Wayne-South Bend will celebrate the annual Red Mass for all members of the legal profession at 5:15 p.m. on Tuesday, October 26, in the Basilica of the Sacred Heart.

The annual Red Mass is for judges, lawyers, law school professors, law students, and government officials, regardless of religious affiliation.…

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Oct 27

Wednesday Oct 27, 2021

Kroc-Kellogg Peace, Conflict, Crime and Violence Workshop

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Location: C104/105 Hesburgh Center for International Studies

"No Country for Criminals: Understanding Support for Iron Fist Candidates in Brazil"

Featuring Jake Turner, PhD Candidate, Department of Political Science

Open to Ph.D. students, fellows, and faculty who are interested in civil war, violence, crime, peace, conflict management, and conflict resolution. The workshop is an informal gathering to discuss work-in-progress, dissertation chapters and proposals, practice conference talks, etc.

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Oct 28

Thursday Oct 28, 2021

The Reconstruction Amendments: America's Rights Revolution

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Location: McCartan Courtroom, ND Law School

Join us for a lecture by Prof. Laura Edwards (Princeton) on "The Reconstruction Amendments: America's Rights Revolution". This lecture is the keynote event for the Notre Dame Law Review's annual symposium, this year entitled "Constitutional Reconstruction: History and the Meaning of the Thirteenth, Fourteenth, and Fifteenth Amendments." The conference will take place on Thursday October 28 and Friday October 29. More information about the event can be found here

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Oct 29

Friday Oct 29, 2021

Conference - Constitutional Reconstruction: History and the Meaning of the Thirteenth, Fourteenth, and Fifteenth Amendments

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Location: 1030 Jenkins Nanovic Hall

The CCCG and Notre Dame Law Review is proud to present this year's annual NDLR Symposium, "Constitutional Reconstruction: The History and the Meaning of the Thirteenth,Fourteenth, and Fifteenth Amendments"

Events include the keynote address on Friday, October 28, delivered by Prof. Laura Edwards (Princeton): "The Reconstruction Amendments: America's Rights Revolution". More information can be found here

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Oct 29

Friday Oct 29, 2021

Ahead of the Game with Arts & Letters: "Looking Back to Move Forward: The 1975 Voting Rights Act and Its Relevance to Today"

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Location: LaBar Recital Hall within O'Neill Hall of Music

A different game plan for autumn weekends. You are invited to join in discussion with Notre Dame’s most engaging faculty on some of the most pressing and fascinating issues of our times. Each lecture and Q&A is presented on a home game Friday.

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