Upcoming Events By Year

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Feb 8

Tuesday Feb 8, 2011

The Choosing People: The Puzzling Politics of American Jews

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Location: 119 O'Shaughnessy Hall

Ken Wald, Distinguished Professor of Political Science from the University of Florida, has written about the relationship of religion and politics in the United States, Great Britain, and Israel. His most recent books include The Politics of Cultural Differences: Social Change and Voter Mobilization Strategies in the Post-New Deal Period (co-authored, Princeton University Press, 2002) and Religion and Politics in the United States (4th ed., Rowman & Littlefield, 2003). His articles have appeared in the American Political Science Review, Journal of Politics, American Journal of Political Science, British Journal of Political Science, Social Science Quarterly, and many other journals. Wald co-edits the Cambridge University Press series, "Religion, Politics and Social Theory," edited a special issue of the International Political Science Review in 2004, and serves on the editorial board of two journals.…

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Feb 22

Tuesday Feb 22, 2011

Business and the Politics of Changing Labor Markets: Argentina, Germany, and the United States in Comparison

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Location: Hesburgh Center, Room C103

Sebastian Karcher, Department of Political Science, Northwestern University; Kellogg Institute Visiting Fellow, University of Notre Dame. Karcher studies labor market change in the era of globalization.

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Mar 24

Thursday Mar 24, 2011

Moscow, the Third Rome’ / ‘Kiev, the New Jerusalem’: Religious History and Political Mythology in Contemporary Russia and Ukraine

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Location: DeBartolo Hall, Room 209

Yury Avvakumov, assistant professor of theology, University of Notre Dame

Avvakumov specializes in Russian and Ukrainian religious history and in the theology and history of the Byzantine rite churches (Catholic and Orthodox) from their medieval beginnings to the present day.

Religious history for centuries provided a background for controversies between Ukrainian nationalism and Russian imperialism and was a source of political imagination. Today, religion remains one of the crucial flash points in relations between the two countries and peoples, given that churches and their leaders are actively engaged in political discourse. Ongoing discussions about the “national idea” and “global positioning” of each of these countries between “East” and “West,” “Europe” and “Asia,” make massive use of and recourse to religious history. The lecture will explore some basic paradigms of this discourse. The clash between different ideological orientations will reveal itself as a clash between different understandings of Christianity, its history, and its message in the contemporary world.…

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Mar 30

Wednesday Mar 30, 2011

Women and Political Representation: John Stuart Mill and the Case of Uganda

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Location: Hesburgh Center, Room C103

  • Eileen Hunt Botting, associate professor of political science and gender studies
  • Robert Esuruku; Kellogg Institute visiting fellow; senior lecturer, Institute of Ethics and Development Studies, Uganda Martyrs University

This is part of the Ford Family Program’s Discussions on Development Series

Originally published at al.nd.edu

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Mar 31

Thursday Mar 31, 2011

Lecture: Guillermo Trejo, Political Scientist

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Location: Hesburgh Center, Room C103

Guillermo Trejo, assistant professor of political science, Duke University

Trejo specializes in comparative politics (social conflict, religion, ethnicity, and democratization) and Latin American politics and society. His primary research analyzes the impact of religious competition and multi-party politics on the dynamics of social protest, rebellion, and inter-communal violence among ethnic minorities in Mexico. He is also working on state repression and human rights violations of political dissidents and religious minorities during the Mexican transition to democracy. His work combines quantitative methods with analytic process-tracing and case studies.…

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Apr 18

Monday Apr 18, 2011

"They ask of him only that they be not oppressed": Hume's Philosophy for the Vulgar

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Location: DeBartolo Hall 129

John Danford of Loyola University Chicago will be presenting a talk entitled “’They ask of him only that they not be oppressed’: Hume's Philosophy for the Vulgar”on Monday, April 18, 4:30PM in DeBartolo Hall 129.

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Apr 28

Thursday Apr 28, 2011

Debate: "The EU: Epic Fail?"

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Location: Hesburgh Center Auditorium

Debate: "The EU: Epic Fail?"
 

Thu Apr 28, 2011 • 4:30PM - 6:15PM
Hesburgh Center Auditorium

A debate on the future of the European Union featuring

Sebastian Rosato
Assistant Professor of Political Science

Sebastian Rosato is the author of Europe United: Power Politics and the Making of the European Community

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Apr 29

Friday Apr 29, 2011

Custom's Power, Reason's Authority: John Locke and the Myth of "Atomistic" Individualism

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Location: 307 Brownson

The Political Theory Colloquium will be hosting its second last guest for this term this coming Friday. Professor Ruth Grant of Duke University will be presenting a paper entitled, "Custom's Power, Reason's Authority: John Locke and the Myth of 'Atomistic' Individualism." 

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May 6

Friday May 6, 2011

Challenging the Notion of Power: Private Spheres as the Roots of Political Legitimation

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Location: 307 Brownson

Professor Marina Calloni, visiting professor at the Nanovic Institute, will argue that violence and power are inter-subjective determinations, whose contents are culturally and anthropologically variable in space and time and basic elements of systemic structures in form of crystallization and reification of human relationships. 

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Sep 20

Tuesday Sep 20, 2011

After Violence: Participation Over Retaliation in Beslan

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Location: Hesburgh Center, Room C103

Debra Javeline, associate professor of political Science, Kellogg Institute faculty fellow, Kroc Institute faculty fellow, University of Notre Dame

Sponsored by the Kellogg Institute for International Studies; cosponsored by the Kroc Institute for International Peace Studies

Originally published at al.nd.edu

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Sep 27

Tuesday Sep 27, 2011

The 1977 Carter Notre Dame Commencement Address in the History of Human Rights

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Location: Geddes Hall, Andrews Auditorium

Samuel Moyn, professor of history, Columbia University

Moyn works primarily on modern European intellectual history, with special interests in France and Germany, political and legal thought, historical and critical theory, Jewish studies, and the history of human rights.

Sponsored by the Center for Social Concerns…

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Sep 28

Wednesday Sep 28, 2011

The Whole is at Stake

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Location: Hesburgh Library, Carey Auditorium

Horst Köhler, former president of Germany (2004–2010) and former managing director of the IMF.

The topic of this Nanovic Institute for European Studies forum is comparative world politics.

For location information, contact the Nanovic Institute at 574.631.5253.

Sponsored by the Nanovic Institute for European Studies; co-sponsored by the Notre Dame Institute for Advance Study…

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Oct 3

Monday Oct 3, 2011

Careers in Intelligence and National Security

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Location: Hesburgh Library Auditorium

Keynote by Notre Dame Alumna with Defense Intelligence Agency

Presentations by three agencies and Networking Forum

Dress-Business Casual

RSVP on The Career Center's Facebook page

Co-Sponsored by The Career Center, The Department of Political Science and The Notre Dame International Security Program…

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Oct 4

Tuesday Oct 4, 2011

Transitions to Democracy and the Arab Spring: Are There Lessons from the Latin American Experience for the Middle East?

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Location: Hesburgh Center Auditorium

At the end of the 1970s, the vast majority of governments in Latin America were military dictatorships. By 1990, most had been replaced with elected governments — a dramatic transition to democracy in just over a decade.

Today in the Middle East, pro-democracy protests are unfolding. In Egypt and Tunisia, popular movements have overthrown dictatorships and elections are planned. Does the region hold the same potential as Latin America for democratic transition? Can insights from Latin America be applied to the Middle East?…

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